What do you get when you mix Mistletoe, Mobsters & Mozzarella? Answer: another amazing book from @peggy_jaeger! #romcom #murder #mystery #novels #christmas #fiction

What do you get when you mix Mistletoe, Mobsters & Mozzarella? Answer: another amazing book from @peggy_jaeger! #romcom #murder #mystery #novels #christmas #fiction Continue reading

Several words to describe this #novella by @_iris_b ’emotional’ ‘quick read’ and ‘captivating’. #romance #newbeginnings #fiction #heartwarming #books

Several words to describe this #novella by @_iris_b ’emotional’ ‘quick read’ and ‘captivating’. #romance #newbeginnings #fiction #heartwarming #books Continue reading

Check out this cracking #book to help us through covid. Plus an interview with the character Josh, courtesy of author @Callie_Carmen. #romance #hotfiction

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Joshua (Risking Love Book 5)  by Callie Carmen Automobile executive Joshua Winfield had no idea that he had two women in love with him. When he finally figured it out would he choose the new woman in his life that … Continue reading

Enjoy books like Dallas or Dynasty? Then check out @KFJohnsonbooks #AfricanAmerican

They say good girls finish last…but when they’re bad, they’re better! K. F Johnson presents   Rome wasn’t built in a day, and in this present-day drama, neither was the façade four cousins spent a lifespan constructing: Valerie’s just recovered from … Continue reading

What does a ‘trashy novel’ really mean? #romcom #trashy

I always thought the answer was gratuitous sex scenes amongst shallow characters, but others have told me it’s an insignificant plot. I Googled the answer and (palpitations!) it brought up chick lit. Chick lit! Surely not the light-hearted books I … Continue reading

Is chick lit intellectual enough for you?

by
Laura Barnard 

Often, when I tell people I’ve written a
book their face lights up.  



‘What kind of
book is it?’ they ask, surprised that I could write more than a post-it note.



‘Chick-lit.’ 


Then their faces drop.

It grates on me that the minute they hear ‘chick-lit’ they dismiss it as if I’ve written nothing more than a diary entry. I’m proud to be a writer of chick-lit and also proud that I’m an avid reader of it.


It’s
considered to not be intellectual enough for some people.  Unless you’re reading something that is
ridiculously confusing and makes your head hurt you’re not smart enough to be
considered a book-worm.

Author Laura Barnard


I couldn’t disagree more.  Any book, regardless of genre, is good as
long as people enjoy it.  



Why do I read
chick lit?
 L
ike most people I have a busy life, and at the end of the day I enjoy a cup of tea and to indulged in
someone else’s life. I don’t want to
read a horror and be scared someone is out there waiting to
kill me, neither do I want to read a thriller (after a long day I can barely remember my name let alone keep track of a
government agent double crossing another agent!).  



What I want is to read about a group of friends having fun. I want to hear about other women getting into
tricky, hilarious situations
. Most of
all I want to fall in love with a gorgeous man who I can dream about without
the guilt of them being a real person. I’ve
been known to utter a fictional character’s name in my sleep much to the horror
of my husband. I can reassure him he’s
not a real person.


What I’ve decided instead is that these
people who judge are pretentious idiots with nothing better to do with their
lives. But each to their own. I personally judge a book on
how it makes me feel by the end. If I
loved it and can’t get it out of my head it’s a winner.

  
Website | Facebook |Twitter



Introducing…


The Debt and the Doormat





Poppy and Jazz have been best friends from the first week of uni. Whenever these two get together trouble isn’t far away and things haven’t changed much. When Jazz gets herself into financial trouble Poppy, being a good friend, offers to help. She instead ends up being talked into swapping lives, with Jazz insisting it will be good and help her get over her broken heart. 


Poppy is thrown into a new life, full of crazy housemates; there’s fitness freak Izzy, horrendously beautiful bitch Grace and the slightly gorgeous, if not incredibly grumpy Ryan. Quickly, with the help of Jazz, her life is thrown upside down. Madness ensues and her need to please everyone gets her in more trouble than she could ever imagine.


Before she knows it she’s got a fake boyfriend and is hiding so many secrets she’s scared they’ll spill out any minute. With a bullying boss, a sex crazed colleague, a mental mother and three brothers each with their own dramas, life has gotten pretty difficult for Poppy. And all of this would be much easier, if she could just stop falling over. 

Will she get her life back to normal before her brother’s upcoming wedding? And will she want to?

At time of posting this book is FREE!

Contemporary Romance defined

by
Elizabeth Jasper Writer
Contemporary ~ adj.   1. living, occurring, or originating at the
same time.  2. Belonging to, or occurring
in the present > modern in style or design.
Amazon.UK
Amazon.com
Smashwords

Romance ~ noun.   1. A
pleasurable feeling of excitement and wonder associated with love > a love
affair, especially a relatively brief and light-hearted one. > a book or
film dealing with love in a sentimental or idealized way.  2. a quality of feeling of mystery, excitement
and remoteness from everyday life.  3. A
medieval tale dealing with a hero of chivalry, of the kind common in the
Romance languages.  4. Music, a short
informal piece.
~ verb. 1. Be involved in an amorous relationship with (someone).  2. Seek the attention or custom of,
especially by use of flattery.  3.
romanticize. (OCED, 11th
Edition, Revised)


From the point of view of a writer, the
‘contemporary’ part of the genre title is straightforward.  If you, or someone you know, or know of, who
has lived through the events or period described, then that is
contemporary.  So, when I wrote a story
about a girl growing up in the 1960s, it could be described as contemporary
because I, along with many other people, can remember the 1960s and the events
that took place back then. As the girl in the story was only eleven, there was
no question of there being any ‘romance’ in there whatsoever. 

Romance, though, is a particularly difficult
term for the writer to quantify.  When
does a story become a romance?  Is it
when the protagonists exchange warm glances, or when they first kiss, or when
they achieve their (ahem!) happy ending?  How much romantic content is necessary in a
book for it to be described as a romance? How much does romance have to do with
sex? Does a focus on the sexual aspects of a relationship mean a book cannot be
described as a romance? When does a book move beyond being described as a sexy
romance into the realms of erotic fiction? How does Chick-Lit fit in to
contemporary romance? Or, is it a question of a reader instinctively knowing
what contemporary romance is when she reads it?
Amazon.UK
Amazon.com
Smashwords

I’m currently writing a sequel to the 1960s
story, and it does have some romantic aspects. Teenage girls and boys are
discovering one another throughout the story and by the end they have
boyfriends and girlfriends.  How can I
describe this story?  YA Romance, Coming
of Age Romance, or just YA or Coming of Age? When my mum’s best friend devours
Mills & Boom Romances by the dozen, it would appear to be straightforward,
but Mills & Boon have ‘levels’ of romance, from innocent, romantic
relationships to quite steamy ones. Then there is the infamous ’Fifty Shades of
Grey’.  Romance, or erotica?  If a relationship is examined in depth within
a book, does that qualify as romance, even if the relationship is abusive but
the protagonists love one another?

Amazon.UK
Amazon.com
Smashwords

So many questions, and the answers will be
different from every reader’s or writer’s point of view depending on their
personal experiences and preferences. 
So, how can a writer judge
whether or not their work is a romance? 
Answers on a postcard…

Elizabeth Jasper