Some believed in fate, and Darren was a true believer but when Julie never reciprocated his advances they just never happened. Until she was sent back in time to the 1970s and met Darren again in a way she never expected. #timetravel #paranormalbooks #iartg #wrpbks #RRBC

Julie should be dead, yet she was in someone else’s body and living their life through her eyes. And if things couldn’t get any worse, it was 1972. Julie Compton’s life should have ended when she crashed the car, instead … Continue reading

Only #99c for readers who loved the Time Traveler’s Wife – Wide Awake Asleep #bookboost #soulmate

‘Past events can be changed but one must be careful of how one does it because it’ll impact on the rest of one’s life.’—Dáire Quin, Modify your Destiny if you Must, 2003 Wide Awake Asleep No one saw Julie’s car … Continue reading

If you liked the #Brit series Life on Mars, you’ll like Wide Awake Asleep #kindleUnlimited #timetravel #timeslips #coma

Free on Kindle Unlimited… Wide Awake Asleep If you don’t know where you’re going, you’ll end up where you least expect Village girl Julie Compton couldn’t wait to leave Potterspury, her mum, boyfriend and best friend when they turned against … Continue reading

Louise Wise’s new time-travel romance out for Christmas!

Coming soon… Village girl Julie Compton couldn’t wait to leave Potterspury, neither could she wait to turn her back on her mum, boyfriend and best friend when they cruelly conspired against her and turned her cossetted life upside down and inside … Continue reading

Returning to Eden’s prehistoric #scifi saga that stole the hearts of #readers everywhere.

‘I’m scared’, Fly had said. He was never scared. He was her hero. Her rugged hero made up from all the romance books she’d read. Big, bold and beautiful—in an alien kind of way. Jenny’s from Earth. Fly’s from Itor. … Continue reading

The worst thing you can say to someone with #depression is ‘pull yourself together’.

‘I’m not angry, moody or resentful. I just don’t like people.’ – Valerie Anthrope. ‘Oh no, I’ve Fallen in Love! comes a warm, tear-jerking story of strong women, bad-turned-good men and the power of friendship. Valerie’s life has been one of … Continue reading

More rants from the minds of fictional people – Benefit Street

 Bolshy, moody and downright badtempered Valerie Anthrope gives her opinion on the current TV show Benefit Street.
Amazon
I watched Benefit Street last night, and my
God, I wanted to reach into the TV screen and slap every one of those lazy,
good-for-nothings. How dare they think they have a right to our precious welfare
system, built to provide for the needy NOT the lazy.


There was one woman (she ate her way through her dole cheque judging by
her size) who believed she was the spokeswoman for the entire street and wouldn’t
let anyone else get a word in. She seemed to think that what she received in
handouts wasn’t enough because she was forced—yeah right—to go to soup kitchens
just to eat. Did I mention she was fat? That’s some soup!

And then there was this guy
whose ‘job’ was scrounging for more money on the streets (to top up his
benefits) from the hard-working. 

Another stole for a living to
feed his six kids. He said he can’t work because he needs to help his wife look
after the sprogs, on the plus side it’s a two-parent family. Think he was a rarity on that street.

And all those people, well the
majority anyway had mobile phones, flatscreen TV, they smoked and managed to
sink several pints in the pub on a daily basis! That’s not struggling on the
welfare system that’s bloody taking the piss!

Work-shy scrougers the lot of them. – Valerie Anthrope from Oh no,
I’ve Fallen in Love!

Now for the turn of gullible but thinks-she’s-smart Charlotte (Charlie) Wallis

There was a heart-breaking programme on the box last night. About people living
on welfare, or trying to. Obviously, it isn’t enough money for the poor sods
because the majority are forced to steal just to eat! 
One guy has six children
to feed and the money he’s given isn’t enough for them. Just because he’s on
benefits doesn’t mean his kids are! The children shouldn’t have to suffer.
Where is their support, eh? 

A lady, White Dee, I think
her name was, was the street’s backbone. An intelligent voice among the demoralised.


The programme was a little bit of a circus for the working smug, which I don’t think was the intention, or at least I hope not, becuase once you’re on
the downward slope of being without a job, with no prospects and live amongst others
like yourself you become discouraged and eventually probably depressed. 

And I should know. I’ve been there. Luckily, I had a friend to pull me back up else I’d probably still be in the gutter. But what do these people have? 

Diddley squat, that’s what. There
needs to be more out there for people who are battling with unemployment. More
help and more money. – Charlie Wallis from A Proper Charlie.

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If (some) indie authors were car dealers.

Here’s an offer you can’t refuse!
If YOU, yes, you, tell everyone about my fabulous cars {please tweet/blog about my god-damn awful book} I’ll take you for FREE 600 mile spin {I’ve made the book free so you have no excuse not to read it}, but you must tell your friends how fab the drive is along those long, dreary, no-sign-of life-anywhere, roads {there’s no plot, just endless waffle}.
I know there are a few silly faults {typos} (broken wing mirror etc, but nothing that will ruin your enjoyment of driving), so I’d like to put it out there that if someone knows of someone who can fix cars for free, {please edit my 600-paged book for free} I will personally put their name in the window of my shop, which will bring them potentially LOTS of clients especially as I’ll tell all my customers how fabulously you fixed them. I can’t be fairer than that, can I?
My cars are special. You won’t find a Mini, Fiat or a Range Rover, but a mismatch of each and every car the world over so one size fits all! {The genre is mixed: romance, horror, crime, suitable from birth to 100, has a mix of comedy and noire. Oh, and bondage, and don’t forget the vampire!}.
I’ve cleaned each and every car myself because I can’t afford staff, but hey, I have a degree in cleaning so it’s all good {I uploaded my own photos}. Anyway, I’ve have no complaints so far, all my friends and family think they are beautiful cars. 
But oh, and when I asked for advice on the colour of one of my cars, I didn’t expect people to hurt my feelings {not interested in hearing the truth}. That was mean. I LOVE the yellow and brown and think it compliments the red polka dots stickers perfectly {really awful cover photo-shopped cover}


And I KNOW the steering is wonky in all of the cars, which sends them from one side of the road to the other, but that’s part of their charm! {Mixed POV. Even the cat has its own storyline.}

So, open to you, who wants the privilege of reviewing/mending my cars? {read and tell me it’s the best thing since, like, ever!}


The offer is there for one week only so hurry or you could miss out!!
The offer has been extended for a MONTH!

Anyone?

A British read that sums up the entire chick lit genre: fun, relationships and ‘finding yourself’.

Sssh, don’t tell everyone, but it’s half price for one week only


Sorry, folks, but it’s back to normal price now.

A Proper Charlie

Charlie Wallis is ditzy but her heart is the right place, it’s just a shame her brain isn’t.
Without a family, she was brought up in a children’s home and subsequently craves to fall in love and be loved herself. She is heart-broken when her boyfriend dumps her, but then feels attracted to her boss, Ben. And it’s mutual! Problem is he’s wanted for murder.
Is her life destined to meet bad men? Or is Ben as innocent as he claims?
A true British book – A Proper Charlie will take you around the streets of London on Charlie’s journey to contentment, and it’s where she least expects to find it!

99c / 77p for one week only!

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Louise Wise’s page turner two-parter!

Eden #1

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Her senses were acute to sound, and her brain
nagged her to flee, but she remained motionless. The old, old trick: play dead.

 
Imagine being an astronaut.


Now imagine applying for a mission where you became one of the first humans to travel outside the solar system.

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The training couldn’t prepare you for what was about to happen–the unimaginable.

Jenny Daykin, her co-travellers presumed dead, became shipwrecked on Eden.


She wasn’t alone.


Jenny Daykin, ordinary woman with an extraordinary dilemma: kill or be killed. Surrender or invade. Hunt or Hunted. Love or hate.

Hunted #2

As the only survivors they rely on one another. But he isn’t human and the place she calls home, isn’t Earth

 

Nook  

Jenny chose love. An emotion only felt by higher species such as you or I. 

But do so-called ‘higher species’ need to have the thought-process of hope love? Or are such emotions mere survival instincts? Or, even, a disabling thought-process? 

An error of human-kind?


Somehow, Jenny found herself wondering just that as she was forced to quell her emotions in order to survive.

Sad scenes say so much…

Yeah, I know the song title is Sad Songs (say so much) by Elton John but for July’s theme I’m asking for the most tear-jerking scene in your novel (reading or writing).

Scenes should be no more than 500 words long. Make me cry! Send in your most emotional scenes, author media and book details (if you’re an author), if you’re a reader all you need to send me is the scene. My Email
Here’s my sad scene from Oh no, I’ve Fallen in Love! Valerie Anthrope has finally realised that her past has much to do with how she is feeling. The house she lived in as a child is full of sad memories: the death of her baby brother, her parents and nan. Their deaths are all linked to a curse she received as a child. And now that her boyfriend has declared his undying love, she needs to get away before he becomes the next casualty.

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My house was unwelcoming. Its furnishings
tortured me in their familiarity. How could everything be the same, when inside
I was dying? I walked through the rooms. I no longer liked the home that I’d
grown up in. It was too full of memories; of my mum’s endless crying and of my
dad’s tortured eyes. In every room, I could still hear the echo of her sobbing,
and see the ghost-like image of my dad as he stood nervously on the side-lines.

   Suddenly, I could see myself as an eight-year-old
little girl. I was sitting on the stairs, watching the ambulance from the
opened doorway as the paramedics took Sean’s small body away. Mum and Dad had
followed them, their heads lowered and shoulders slumped, and every now and
then Mum’s body jerked with a tearful spasm. My nan was crying into a large
handkerchief and every time I asked what was happening and when Sean would be
better, she’d only wailed louder. The house represented everything I was hiding
from. There were no happy memories here. Only mourning.

Oh no, I’ve Fallen in Love!

Amazon 

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Valerie Anthrope has a problem. Only she shies away from
acknowledging it. On the outside, she’s a cut-throat business woman running her
own financial brokerage. On the inside, she’s lonely, and frightened her past
will catch up with her.
And when it does, she’s not prepared. 
She’ll never be prepared for what awaits her.
Dark romance.

In the celebration of motherhood…

Nineteen authors from around the world were given six weeks or less
to prod
uce a story involving a mother, and the result is here! 

In A Kind of Mad Courage, we have a collection of tales that will make you laugh, cry, and truly appreciate the “mad courage” of motherhood. 

 

Samantha Stroh Bailey – “Hide and Seek”

Regina Cash-Clark – “Autumn’s Eyes”

Laura Chapman – “Oh Baby”

Elke Feuer – “The Sacrifice”

Diana Gliedman – “Love in the Time of Cannibals”

Carey Heywood – “A Poem for Mommy”

Wendy Janes – “Verity”

Francine LaSala – “Monkey Bread”

Sheryn MacMunn – “Last Words”

Nikki Mahood – “This Year’s Love”

Karen E. Martin – “Two Thousand Steps”

Heather McCoubrey – “Emily’s Promise”

Monique McDonell – “A Tale of Two Mothers”

Maria Schulz – “Like a Boomerang”

Jen Tucker – “Heartstrings”

Donna Valenti – “In the Nick of Time”

Julie Valerie – “LLL”

k.c. wilder – “Lady in Red”

Louise Wise – “Becky’s Mum”
 
Amazon.UK | Amazon.com

Heard of reverse promotion?

For something different in May I’m offering space on my blog for those who dare to write reverse promotion about their book (or themselves). It’s a fun/evil way of talking about your bad characters, or your characters’ worse traits (they aren’t perfect, I hope!), and dishing the dirt on your writing style. 

Apple
iStore

Here’s my reverse promotion on my romantic comedy – 



A Proper Charlie.



The book is British and set in London, so for any non Britons reading be prepared for a lot Brit lingo that’ll confuse the stuffing out of you. The main character, Charlie Wallis, also has ginger hair, and if that isn’t enough to put you off she’s too needy, too trusting and an utter doormat to her loser of a boyfriend, Andy.

The genre is romantic comedy but love scenes don’t come easy to me so I took the easy way out and wrote bad sex scenes–I’ve had lots of experience (did I just say that out loud?). Anyhoo, here’s short ‘sexy’ excerpt:



He stood
up – it took several attempts – but he eventually stood before her. ‘Had one
pint, that’s all,’ he said, pronouncing pint as “point”. He staggered
sidewards, righted himself, but then staggered the other way. He sat back down.
‘Think my drink was spiked.’
Charlie
sat next to him. ‘Sorry I yelled, love. I’m tired, that’s all. You could have
asked me about having your mates here. I wouldn’t have minded,’ she lied. She
always felt the need to count the cutlery after they’d been round.
Andy
swallowed a belch and nodded.
She
slipped her arms around his waist. ‘I’m not too tired for making love, though.’
‘Need a
piss,’ he said and pulled away from her. Before he got to the bathroom, his fly
was undone and he was pulling his penis from his boxers. He peed with the door
open and then staggered back towards Charlie, tucking it away. He wiped his
hands on his jeans.
‘Let’s
shag until morning,’ he said with a grin. 
He tripped and crashed to the ground by her feet. He laughed, belched,
and fell asleep.

A Proper Charlie is real life, real funny and real pink. If you’re a guy you’ll hate it: no guns (heck, this is a British novel!), no babes (heck, this is a British novel!), and no fast cars (heck this is a …). If you’re a girl you’ll hate it too: no hearts and flowers, no sexy guys (unless you find geeky men attractive) and no shiny, sparkly shoes (I don’t think Charlie has any!).


Charlie lives for love but she’s clueless, and clings to her boyfriend unaware that he’s abusing her trust. She’s clueless in everything she does, in fact, as one reviewer put ‘A Proper Charlie is a piece of steaming shite!’ and her boss Ben Middleton (no relation to Kate) gets covered in the stuff! 

So you see, unless you like annoying characters who are not only unlucky in love but useless, then do literature a favour and DON’T buy A Proper Charlie.

So over to you guys. Write something about your book using one of the below styles (or your own idea):

1. 200 to 700 word article (approx) on why people shouldn’t buy {name of book}.
2. 200 to 700 word article (approx) on why people should avoid all your book(s).
3. 200 to 700 word article (approx) on why people should avoid you completely (as a person and/or as an author).

Article (or bullet points) can be funny, argumentative, evil, an utter piss-take, your call.

Send in your author media (links, bio and pic) and book details (purchase links, blurb, extract etc).

Please send all ASAP so I can arrange everyone with dates using the ‘contact’ button top left of screen. All articles will appear here and tweeted out via Triberr. Intros to your article will be posted to WWBB’s Facebook page. All book covers will be posted on Pinterest in the Book Junkies library.

Come on, be brave…

Five Facts about Eden and Hunted

 by 
Louise Wise
  1. Eden began when I was a teen. I had a dream of being abandoned on the moon (that bastard Neil Armstrong and Buzz!) but I didn’t do anything about it until much, much later. Eden took many, many rewrites before I was happy. From that dream you could say it took ten years to write, but the first draft is very different from how it is today. Romance prevails over the sci-fi element.
  2. I didn’t do well at school and was always told I’d never amount to anything, and when I left and joined a creative writing group I was told the old favorite ‘write what you know’. I didn’t know anything (or so I was told)! But I wanted to write, so I thought the easiest genre would be science fiction, my thought process was that I could make everything up and not have to ‘know everything’. Of course, I soon found out I was wrong, every genre needs research and sci-fi has to be based on fact. I discovered a love of astronomy during my research.
  3. Eden was accepted by Darley Anderson but dropped at the last hurdle because publishers thought it was too niche.
  4. Eden is in a ‘trademark’ battle with another book of the same name. There are many Eden books out there and we’ve all existed without problem for many years, but then a new indie author decided to bombard us with letters from his attorney to ‘cease and decease’ from using the title Eden. 
  5. I had a ‘what if’ moment while on holiday and wrote the sequel, Hunted, (in my head) whilst on the beach in sunny Spain. Once I was home I typed out the first draft (50,000 words) in three weeks! I should have entered NaNoWriMo!
Introducing…
Eden
How would you cope being abandoned on a planet you and your crew set out to explore?

You’re from the 23rd century where everything you want and need is there at the end of a button, but now you’re back where civilization began. 


There is no chance of escape or rescue.

But then you discover you aren’t alone, and you realise your nightmare has only just began.

Welcome to Jenny’s world on Eden.

Snippet from Eden
Jenny was hurled to the floor. Winded, but
managing to crawl out of the spaceship, she glimpsed Bodie turning to look and
calling for her to run. Matt picked up a rock and threw it at the alien as it
ran towards them.
She began to stand, but dizziness swamped
her. Trying to ignore the sensation, she staggered away from the spacecraft,
but the ground shifted under her feet. Time was measured for Jenny, yet around
her things were moving fast.
‘Jen! Move!’ yelled Bodie. The alien was in
between her and the two men who, by now, were at the top of the crater. She
couldn’t see them anymore, but only heard Bodie yelling for her.
‘Go! Go! GO!’ she yelled, the movement making
her eyesight pixilate. She gritted her teeth against the dizziness. ‘I’m
coming!’
‘She’s behind us,’ yelled Matt from
somewhere in the distance. ‘Get in your buggy, Bo. Get the fuck in!’
Then, the ground rose up and her head
struck a lump of metal debris protruding from the ground.
There was no more shouting. All was quiet
and peaceful. Jenny opened her eyes and, in a sudden moment of realisation, she
flipped to her side and looked to the top of the hill. With a sick feeling of dread,
she rose and scrambled to the top of the crater. It felt like a mountain, and
she slipped several times. Expecting to find Bodie and Matt dead; their bodies
torn in frenzy under the clawed hands of the alien, she was relieved to find
the men and the buggies were gone.
A glint of sunlight reflecting on something
in the sky caught her eye. The buggies, now small space shuttles, were on their
journey back to Taurus as if being
hauled back up by an invisible string.
Jenny climbed into the buggy. With shaking hands,
she pressed the controls; nothing happened. She spoke into the transmitter, but
remembered that Kate was malfunctioning. Her buggy was immobilised.
‘No, no, no,’ she said. She pressed more
buttons on the screen display. She pumped the accelerator, but nothing happened.
She couldn’t even close the buggy up; instead, it remained open-topped.
She climbed back out, her hands in her hair
as panic momentary claimed her.
‘It’s OK,’ she repeated to herself. ‘It’s
OK. It’s OK. Breathe.’
Her forehead hurt; she touched it,
expecting her fingers to come away bloody, but they were dry. A lump was
beginning to protrude, though, and she suspected she had alien finger-marks
around her throat.
She glanced around her, as if afraid the
alien was close by. Might it be possible that it had gained access to one of
the buggies and was inside Taurus? Kate
was programmed to destroy an intruder immediately, but…
She closed her eyes briefly. She couldn’t
think that way. She climbed back inside the buggy. She’d be OK. Bodie would
realise she’d been left behind. He’d override Kate to get her buggy
operational. She’d wait.
She looked upward at the now empty blue
sky.
Won’t be long, she thought. Around
her, all she could hear was the pounding of her heart. It was a lonely sound.
She sat for a long time with her head tilted back, looking up at the vastness,
the emptiness, of the sky.
As one of the suns set, she finally
acknowledged that she may have to spend a night alone on a strange planet.
Feeling vulnerable and highly visible in the buggy, she climbed out and slipped
beneath it. With the protection of its thick tracks either side of her, she
felt safer, plus she was sheltered from the icy wind that had sprung up.
She huddled in a ball, trying to get
comfortable and remain optimistic; however, as the eerie silence stretched and
played on her imagination, it was difficult to keep hold of her positivity. As the
shadows lengthened and faded, and the remaining seven moons rose and twilight
fell, her confidence had all but gone.
Shock and the long voyage through space had
exhausted her body. She slept, unaware, and, for a sweet moment, her nightmare
of being left on a desolate planet did not present itself in her dreams.
Introducing the sequel…
Hunted

NOOK  
Jenny found happiness from her extraordinary
circumstances after being abandoned on stone-age Eden. With clans of wolf-like
people, Ne
anderthals and a
savage tribe of Owains roaming the planet, she and Fly retreat to a protected corner
of the world.



But things evolve to remind Jenny that the man she’s in love with is an alien, and the world they live on isn’t Earth.


This time, it’s Jenny’s turn to fight for what she wants! It’s that, or die.




Snippet from Hunted
Now that her eyes
were accustomed to the gloom, Jenny could see a whole array of holes. She heard
voices, childlike, and a baby crying. Another face peered out of the wall.
Larger, older, than the others, but still a child. Jenny caught herself
thinking the word. Child. Early and
primitive but children all the same. All were bare of hair, had a small button
nose and a wide mouth. But it was their eyes that enchanted Jenny the most.
They were blue and humanlike.
There was strange
chirping laughter as faces played peek-a-boo with her. It was surreal.
Jenny caught herself.
Of course it was surreal. This was Eden, not Earth. She was living with an
alien man, having his alien baby, running from giant birds and other alien men
and now living with primitive creatures that’d probably rival both Jelvia and
Human when they fully evolved.
The pregnant female
was looking at her. Jenny stared back as Mum fussed around her with her
maracas. The early pain-relief had a lot of catching up to do, Jenny thought,
as a contraction made her gasp. As it passed she looked back at the others.
They were so unlike wolves. She had only called them that because of the
howling. It had been fitting, she thought. ‘But not now,’ she said aloud.
She’d finally seen it
with Bo—up close up there was nothing wolf-like about them at all. The pregnant
female was lying on her side and the other was rubbing her back as she
whimpered and made small chep-chep-chep
sounds. Mum made soft noises in return and bustled around her—patting the
foliage and furs around her form as if making her comfortable.
Jenny watched them
until a wave of pain descended on her so hard she threw back her head and
screamed. The pain had no respite now, it was continuous and she no longer
noticed her surroundings. Gentle, hairy hands moved around her and pulled off
her lower clothes. Then she was lifted beneath the armpits into a half
squatting, half-standing pose.
‘Fly-yyyyyyyyyyyy!’
Jenny yelled. A howl outside the cave answered her shout. ‘Oh, Fly,’ she said
on a half cry.
There came the soft chep-chep-chep voices in her ear. She smells, was Jenny’s last coherent
thought as her body took over from her brain, and the urge to push became so
overwhelming it couldn’t be ignored.
Then the agony was
forgotten as her baby fell into the soft nest below.

Writing for children isn’t as easy as it looks!

My February theme has drawn a blank since no writers of children novels have come forward to write the whys and hows of writing in that genre, and so you’re left with me to fill a gap.

In the early days of my writing career someone once asked why I never wrote children’s books. ‘Surely,’ they said, ‘that’s the genre to begin with and then you can progress to adult literature.’

Foolishly, I believed this person. I began my children’s adventure book about a young girl who loved ponies. Out riding she ended up in an enchanted garden, and had many adventures with the strange fairy folk who lived there.

I took it to my creative writing mentor and excitedly showed him my first draft.

‘Hmm,’ he said, ‘it’s a bit Enid Blyton.’

Miffed, I went back to my story and tried to modernise it by dropping in ‘cool!’ and an odd ‘funky’ (bear in mind, this was the 80s!).

My mentor smirked when he saw my efforts. ‘You need to do more than add youth-speak. You need to become a child. Get into their minds. And what ever you do, don’t patronise.’

I never realised I had been patronising in my fast-becoming redundant story. But when I read it back, I could clearly see that I was. I was talking down to the reader, and recreating scenes from in my adult eyes instead of being that child again.

My career writing for children came to a very swift end, until now. My fifth novel involves a woman being taken back to her past where she relives her youth. I must admit, I was struggling, until I realised I could get around it by having her adult self inside her younger body (so she retained her mind and memories).

I’ve dubbed the book Crossroads, and researching the 70s has been a trip down
nostalgia lane, but as for writing for children, I’ll leave that to the writers who can!

Crossroads is in its draft stage at the moment, and if all goes well, I’ll publish it early 2015. Meanwhile, if you have anything to say regarding writing for children please feel free to get in touch via the ‘contact’ button at the top of this page. I’ll love to hear from you!






Louise Wise