If you are a writer or blogger you should know the importance of TAGS

But first what are they?
In computer terminology, a tag is a keyword which provides a visual suggestion of the number of articles tagged with a keyword. The more popular a keyword the larger it will appear in the tag cloud.
In easy-speak if you were to search the Internet for say, help or advice on blogging, you’d head over to Google or Bing and put in the search engine “blogging help” or similar. And the savvy blogger would have used your words as taglines because he wants you to visit his page.
Now, if I wanted you to be able to find my book, A Proper Charlie easily, my tags would be “chicklit” “romance” “Louise Wise” etc and your searching words would generate my taglines to be at the top, or near to the top, of your search and hopefully you’ll click to be taken to my book.
On various blogs or websites taglines look like this:
The larger the word the more popular they are. Or they can be neat like an index. But either, they work the same. Tags are generally chosen informally and personally by the blogger. It’s wise to chose them to best describe the article written.
For this one I shall use, taglines, what are taglines, how to use taglines etc.
If you have a book out and it’s on Amazon make sure you have tagged your book. At the bottom of the Amazon page you should see “Tags Customers Associate with This Product” and then a list of taglines. These are the tags that generous people have given your book. And I say generous because it IS generous. Every little tag helps navigate potential readers towards your book.
There is an option to add your own, and I fully recommend you do so. As many as you can think of relevant to your book. Mine for Eden are: science fiction romance, romance, science fiction, survival, louise wise, love story, love, relationships, contemporary romance, best sellers, holiday read, quick read, a must read, romance novel, eden,  social media.

Louise Wise
Author of Eden and A Proper Charlie

The important of the dialogue tag…SAID

Why the tagline ISN’T boring and should be used AT ALL TIMES – told through the eyes of a novice.
‘But “said” is boring. Why can’t I use other taglines such as “demanded”, “whispered”, or “shouted”?’ I said, and reached for a red apple from the fruit bowl.


‘Because “said” is invisible,’ said my writing coach. ‘“Demanded”, “whispered”, and “shouted”, are not. Well, “whispered” isn’t so bad, and neither is “shouted” if used sparingly, but “demanded”?’ He shook his head. ‘Don’t even think of it.’

‘What about -’

‘No.’
I glowered at him as I rubbed the apple to a mirror-shine on my arm. It flaked a bit; must have been in the fruit bowl a while. ‘Well, how do you make clear somebody is shouting or whispering or being demanding then?’

‘With good prose and a little trust of your readers.’
‘Trust?’ I took a bite of the apple. ‘What are you talking about?’


‘Do you mind?’ My writing coach brushed off sprayed pieces of Royal Gala. ‘If your writing is strong, your readers will know whether your characters have “whispered” “shouted” or “whined.”’

‘I can’t have whined?’
‘Certainly not! Use your writing style to direct your readers to what your characters are saying.’

I pointed the apple at him in excitement. ‘But that’s telling. We’ve always been told not to tell. Ha! Gotcha.’

My coach, sighing, pushed the apple away from his face. ‘Telling is something different. Telling is just that, telling –’

‘So well explained. Not.’ I chewed on the apple somewhat triumphantly. ‘My English teacher taught me to use my imagination for taglines. I remember I had to think of fifty alternatives for homework and then use them in a story the next day. I thought up more than fifty. Wanna hear them?’


‘Er, no thanks.’
‘Go on. You’ll be amazed: cooed, fenced, claimed, queried, presented, alleged –’
‘Creative writing is different to the English lessons you had at school.’ He reached for his coat.
‘Going so soon?’
‘I’ve just remembered I needed to de-flea the cat.’
I put the core of my apple in my pocket – there wasn’t a bin, and I loathed litter.
My coach nodded to my core, safely nestling inside my coat. ‘Why’d you do that?’
‘I hate litter. Law-abiding citizen, me.’


‘Unnecessary taglines can be described as litter. They are pointless, and clutter up your writing,’ he said as I stared at him with slow realisation dawning on my face. ‘Worse, they can distract your reader from the story.’


‘They aren’t helping the reader, then?’


He shook his head. ‘Not in the slightest. Do you think your readers are stupid? Do you think they can’t understand whether your characters are shouting, querying or even whispering? Or do you think your writing is so poor that you can’t engage your readers in what your characters are saying?’

‘Neither. I think neither!’

‘Well then.’ He looked pleased with himself as he buttoned up his coat. ‘Next time though let’s have this discussion during the writing circle meeting, and not in the gents’.’

‘Sure.’ I grabbed another apple. ‘Posh place though. I mean, not often you get fruit in the loos.’


‘You’ll find,’ he said with a smirk, ‘those apples are soap.’